Saturday, August 8, 2020

Am I Plagiarizing An Advanced Infographic

Am I Plagiarizing An Advanced Infographic (16) Have you done a research paper or project before? Then you’re probably no stranger to the concept of plagiarism! It’s something we’re taught to be aware of, scared of, opposed to, andâ€"above all elseâ€"avoid.  We’ve all seen how serious the consequences can be from stories at school and in the news: failing a class paper, being expelled from school, costing a job or money, and more. With so much at stake, the important question arises: how do we prevent it from happening in the first place? The simple answer is citing! That includes providing a full bibliography, and in-text citations (like APA or MLA parenthetical citations), where needed. To help you in your quest to avoid plagiarism, we’ve put together a simple infographic below. Using the flowchart, you can determine if you’re plagiarizing or how to avoid doing so. Feel free to print and share! Looking for citation help? Try . It’s free and easy to create citations in MLA citation format, or to read through our citation guides. Those with an EasyBib Plus subscription get the extra perks of creating citations in APA and other styles, and access to our automatic plagiarism and grammar checker. Check it out today! Worried about your grammar? Try the EasyBib Plus paper checker for suggestions on how to improve your writing and to spot accidental plagiarism before its a problem. Also, refresh your knowledge of the basics with our grammar guides on verbs, what is an adjective, the difference between proper and common nouns, and more!

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Ethical Revaltivism Essay - 1100 Words

Ethical Revaltivism (Essay Sample) Content: Ethical RelativismNameInstitutionDateEthical Relativism Ethical relativism is an assumption that determines what a society or culture says is true. Whether Individual or societal ethical Relativism, the determinants of both can either be out of their own ethical codes-away from professional standards of beliefs, communal rules, and faith. For example, ethical concerns normally pertain to a particular group surroundings such as ethical issues in management or banking. This diversion in ethics and morals serves to separate ethics into dickens perception known as individual and societal ethics. This implies that moral standards are not widespread, but are reliant upon a certain cultural or social background. Therefore, what morality needs is comparative to society. I agree with Albert Carrs opinion that business should be practiced like a game. He creates an opinion which many individuals in and out of the business world deem appalling. The reason for this ethical infuri ation and repulsion is based in the mystification individuals make among the principles of private life and the principles of business. The fact, that a business, as practiced by persons as well as a corporation, has the remote disposition of a game a game that requires both exceptional stratagem and an understanding of its unique principles. Once the person enters into a business state of affairs, one is therefore, essential in a game situation and achievement or disappointments depends mostly on ones capability, no matter what ones position in the company, to participate the game in the right way. For Carr, these two features are dissimilar and detached from each other, and to look forward to the ethics of our personal lives to decree over our business lives is bad business. He disputes that once businessmen are in their work zone they stop to be private inhabitants and in its place become game dramatis personae that are steered by a dissimilar deposition of moral standards. Acc ording to Carr, business peoples all, at one time or another, feel the pressure to misinform. They are obliged, in the wellbeing of their business, to carry out some form of dishonesty when engaged in consultation with clientele. This dishonesty by watchful misstatements, disguise of facts or overstatement is taken on in the quest to convince others to concur with them. Concurrence, of course, entails a host of remunerations for either the person or business or for both. According to Carr, if a businessman declines to take on in these acts of dishonesty, then he is disregarding opportunities tolerable under the rules of the game and efficiently setting his business at a grave disadvantage. Therefore, to do without these individual ethical responsibilities and doubts about dishonesty and to realize the efficacy of the "sham" as a justifiable instrument within the game of business engrosses an acknowledgment by the businessman that in deceiving he will not misplace self-worth or becom e psychologically distressed. What this mean is that if the businessman wants to achieve a harmonious unity between his personal integrity and high standards of honesty, then he must believe that his acts of dishonesty are ethically acceptable. Carr position is criticized by William Shaw who states that he is protecting some sort of moral relativism as well as splitting business from principles, he misrepresent both business and ethics. He also adds that Carr inaccurately treats the regulations of everyday business goings-on as separate from regulations of everyday principles Rules are vital to the accomplishment of a business. It oversees employees conduct and standards great importance. A Business should be permitted to play by its individual set of laws because in keeping with its strict tasks each business endeavors to uphold the utmost standard of moral code. Meticulous businesses are one that occasionally step back and observe whether it is responsible to the environment, ec onomy, and society with which it deals frequently. The test of lack of restrictions from preferential treatment is the ability to uphold good successful associations with all parties to a disagreement. This is realized through ensuring that its employees share that objective. Each staff member should adhere to the rules watchfully and reflect on different ways of applying the rules to their duties. The business should also recognize that employees should be open to do innovative, civic and individual work and to receive extra earnings in ways separate from their work in the business. Conflicts of interest, real or apparent, may arise in many areas. The reputation of any business rests upon that discernment, and so do the professional status of its employees. A business and its separate business division should share such interests so as to avoid any manifestation of disagreement. Nevertheless, the business should view any deliberate infringement of these rules as a grave misdemeano r that may lead to punitive action, potentially incorporating discharge, subject to the terms of any appropriate collective agreement. In the long run, this acts as the basis for every business reputation and the means by which it accomplishes the public confidence and clients expectations. Apart from that, it is the sole duty of the business to be accountable to the society, surroundings, and economy to the extent of forming partnerships and associations so as to avert the appearance of prejudice. Cultivating such basis is necessary and effective in familiar surroundings outside of ordinary business times. Businesses rely on rules to make an ethical decision regarding ... Ethical Revaltivism Essay - 1100 Words Ethical Revaltivism (Essay Sample) Content: Ethical RelativismNameInstitutionDateEthical Relativism Ethical relativism is an assumption that determines what a society or culture says is true. Whether Individual or societal ethical Relativism, the determinants of both can either be out of their own ethical codes-away from professional standards of beliefs, communal rules, and faith. For example, ethical concerns normally pertain to a particular group surroundings such as ethical issues in management or banking. This diversion in ethics and morals serves to separate ethics into dickens perception known as individual and societal ethics. This implies that moral standards are not widespread, but are reliant upon a certain cultural or social background. Therefore, what morality needs is comparative to society. I agree with Albert Carrs opinion that business should be practiced like a game. He creates an opinion which many individuals in and out of the business world deem appalling. The reason for this ethical infuri ation and repulsion is based in the mystification individuals make among the principles of private life and the principles of business. The fact, that a business, as practiced by persons as well as a corporation, has the remote disposition of a game a game that requires both exceptional stratagem and an understanding of its unique principles. Once the person enters into a business state of affairs, one is therefore, essential in a game situation and achievement or disappointments depends mostly on ones capability, no matter what ones position in the company, to participate the game in the right way. For Carr, these two features are dissimilar and detached from each other, and to look forward to the ethics of our personal lives to decree over our business lives is bad business. He disputes that once businessmen are in their work zone they stop to be private inhabitants and in its place become game dramatis personae that are steered by a dissimilar deposition of moral standards. Acc ording to Carr, business peoples all, at one time or another, feel the pressure to misinform. They are obliged, in the wellbeing of their business, to carry out some form of dishonesty when engaged in consultation with clientele. This dishonesty by watchful misstatements, disguise of facts or overstatement is taken on in the quest to convince others to concur with them. Concurrence, of course, entails a host of remunerations for either the person or business or for both. According to Carr, if a businessman declines to take on in these acts of dishonesty, then he is disregarding opportunities tolerable under the rules of the game and efficiently setting his business at a grave disadvantage. Therefore, to do without these individual ethical responsibilities and doubts about dishonesty and to realize the efficacy of the "sham" as a justifiable instrument within the game of business engrosses an acknowledgment by the businessman that in deceiving he will not misplace self-worth or becom e psychologically distressed. What this mean is that if the businessman wants to achieve a harmonious unity between his personal integrity and high standards of honesty, then he must believe that his acts of dishonesty are ethically acceptable. Carr position is criticized by William Shaw who states that he is protecting some sort of moral relativism as well as splitting business from principles, he misrepresent both business and ethics. He also adds that Carr inaccurately treats the regulations of everyday business goings-on as separate from regulations of everyday principles Rules are vital to the accomplishment of a business. It oversees employees conduct and standards great importance. A Business should be permitted to play by its individual set of laws because in keeping with its strict tasks each business endeavors to uphold the utmost standard of moral code. Meticulous businesses are one that occasionally step back and observe whether it is responsible to the environment, ec onomy, and society with which it deals frequently. The test of lack of restrictions from preferential treatment is the ability to uphold good successful associations with all parties to a disagreement. This is realized through ensuring that its employees share that objective. Each staff member should adhere to the rules watchfully and reflect on different ways of applying the rules to their duties. The business should also recognize that employees should be open to do innovative, civic and individual work and to receive extra earnings in ways separate from their work in the business. Conflicts of interest, real or apparent, may arise in many areas. The reputation of any business rests upon that discernment, and so do the professional status of its employees. A business and its separate business division should share such interests so as to avoid any manifestation of disagreement. Nevertheless, the business should view any deliberate infringement of these rules as a grave misdemeano r that may lead to punitive action, potentially incorporating discharge, subject to the terms of any appropriate collective agreement. In the long run, this acts as the basis for every business reputation and the means by which it accomplishes the public confidence and clients expectations. Apart from that, it is the sole duty of the business to be accountable to the society, surroundings, and economy to the extent of forming partnerships and associations so as to avert the appearance of prejudice. Cultivating such basis is necessary and effective in familiar surroundings outside of ordinary business times. Businesses rely on rules to make an ethical decision regarding ...

Saturday, May 23, 2020

John Stuart Mill And Sarah Conly Essay - 1440 Words

John Stuart Mill and Sarah Conly have opposing views on the necessity and justifiability of paternal coercion in a state. This essay will present their views regarding the justifiability of state intervention in the case of sugar tax. I will show what arguments both would use to justify their own opinion and at the end present my own arguments in order to argue that sugar tax would not be the ideal solution but coercive paternalism would still be necessary, although used in a slightly different way. In his book â€Å"On Liberty† Mill states that the only time individuals or society as a whole can interfere with individual liberty is for self-protection and that coercion by the many toward the individual is only acceptable when that specific individual poses a threat to others. This is known as the harm principle: The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. Sarah Conly’s book â€Å"Against Autonomy† proposes many counterarguments to the liberalist approach of Mill. One of her most interesting arguments in defense of coercive paternalism is that â€Å"while in some cases autonomous action does no harm, in other cases it does, however ‘harm’ is construed – as detrimental to happiness, detrimental to material survival, or even detrimental to the promotion of autonomous action.† It is really interesting because it claims that perfect autonomy would be detrimental to itself. To give

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Approaches to Inclusion - 5803 Words

1 Introduction In this report the researcher aims to demonstrate a critical understanding of the principle that early years settings should provide for the needs of all children, including those with sensory and learning needs, gifted children, and children from remote and nomadic populations, children from linguistic, ethnic or religious minorities and children from other disadvantaged or marginalised areas or groups. For the purpose of this report, the researcher will use the term ‘Children with Special Educational Needs’ to refer to the above groups. The researcher will provide a critical awareness on how theoretical models have changed ways of thinking about inclusive practice and the implications of this on legislation and policy†¦show more content†¦All educational policies, says the Framework, ‘should stipulate that disabled children attend the neighbourhood school, ‘that would be attended if the child did not have a disability.’ (UNESCO, 1994., p.24) There is seemingly little doubt that the catalyst for inclusion within the English system lies in the sentiments outlined in the Salamanca Statement. As Hornby, (2002)., asserts, ‘The statement has resulted in what, at times, appears to be a tidal wave of inclusion intent preached with overpowering zeal by the church of inclusion.’ (p.7) It is observable, though, that despite this ‘missionary zeal’ the implementation of inclusionary practices, within the English system, began slowly. Although some might argue that the last Conservative government, through the Code of Practice (DFE, 1994), encouraged children with special educational needs to ‘join fully with their peers in the curriculum and the life of the setting’ (p.11), others contended that: ‘the code only addressed ‘identification and standardisation’ in an attempt to end the vagueness of special educational needs, previously delivered through a postcode lottery of provision.’ (Clough, 1998. p.2) 2.3 Theoretical Models It is commonly accepted that there are two contrasting ‘models’ or ‘views’ of disability currently present within modern dayShow MoreRelatedEquality, diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people837 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿Level 2 Supporting Teaching Learning in Schools Unit 204 Equality, diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people Name: Date: 7th February 2014 This assignment covers all outcomes for Unit 4 1.1 What are the laws and codes of practice that relate to the promotion of equality and the valuing of diversity? (Make a list). Disability Discrimination Acts 1995 2005 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 Race Relations Amendment Act 2000 Human Rights Act 1998 Read MoreA Market Based Approach For Community Development Essay1400 Words   |  6 Pagesmarket-based approaches to community development. This paper will look at how a market based approach to community development is an important component of community development because it is the appropriate response to the current socio-economic, and political context that our country is in. A market-based approach provides a mechanism to define relationships and allocate economic resources to create systemic change within communities. increasing opportunities for social inclusion and economicRead MoreThe Carter Review Of Initial Teacher Training952 Words   |  4 Pagesand achievement for all children’. Examples of this move towards inclusion is displayed by the publishing of training resources for SEN co-ordinators, such as ‘Supporting Pupils with Dyslexia (Griffiths, Groom and Smith, 2012, p.65), which projects the ‘idea that dyslexia is not an in surmountable barrier but a condition that requires different approaches’, therefore showing a change of attitude towards SEN in order to provide inclusion and education equality. It is evident that the concept of SENRead MoreHomogenization Of Composite Materials1201 Words   |  5 Pagesequivalent properties of composite materials through methods of homogenization [1]–[3]. The long history of exploration of analytical approaches for homogenization of reinforced composites has already provided us with a rich and practical library of solutions, and this quest is still being pursued [4]. As a decedent of analytical methods, multiple new approaches are being developed by implementing power of computer technology with the goal of providing faster, more accurate and more customized solutionsRead MoreI Am Observing For The After School Action Program Essay1724 Words   |  7 Pagesstudents have learning disabilities. Research has been conducted by my observation of various techniques implemented for the inclusion of these students. During my observation, several approaches have been used with success in retaining students understanding of the material being presented. First, as a student whose major is ECL-6 Special Education, I want to study different approaches to which teachers implement on students with disabilities. Secondly, as I continue to observe, I have become more familiarRead MoreQuestions on Diversity and Inclusions926 Words   |  4 Pagescultures, societies and businesses that have encountered this diversification have had to develop sophisticated codes of conduct to address these problems. What is the difference between diversity and inclusion? Although there are a number of similarities, the concepts of diversity and inclusion are also remarkably distinct (Barak, 2002). Included in the concept of diversity is the idea that there are a great number of groups of people throughout the world all with different experiences. AmongRead MoreInclusion Of Special Needs For Students With Disabilities Essay1174 Words   |  5 PagesOver the course of structuring the education system to include students with disabilities, there has being an ongoing research topic of inclusion. Inclusion, in this area, means the full inclusion of students with special needs in the general education classroom . The research and the debates about the issue of whether or not there should be full inclusion of Special Education students in all general education classrooms in all public schools throughout the United States rages on. The number of studentsRead MorePrinciples, Policies Frameworks of Inclusive Schooling Essay1176 Words   |  5 Pagesrange o f learning styles and needs. My belief is reflected in the increasing amount of policies and legislation being developed at both state and Commonwealth levels. These approaches range from Anti-Discrimination Acts, Child Protection, Disability Services and Privacy Legislation. Examples of a few of the most recent approaches designed to promote and support Inclusive Education include: †¢ School Improvement and Accountability Framework – Destination 2010 Action Plan, 2006 – 2008 †¢ DisabilityRead MoreInclusion Of Special Needs For Students With Disabilities1173 Words   |  5 PagesOver the course of structuring the education system to include students with disabilities, there has being an ongoing research topic of inclusion. Inclusion, in this area, means the full inclusion of students with special needs in the general education classroom. The research and the debates about the issue of whether or not there should be full inclusion of Special Education students in all general education classrooms in all public schools throughout the United States rages on. The number of studentsRead MoreEssay about Adapting the Curriculum Effective Teaching Strategies1641 Words   |  7 PagesThese three approaches will aid teachers in developing a learning environment designed to maximise teaching and learning and make the curriculum accessible to all learners. Part B specifically relates to the advantages and difficulties I may encounter, as a new teacher, during the implementation stages of these models. â€Æ' Part A Discuss in detail ways that teachers can set up the learning environment in order to maximise teaching and learning. There are a variety of approaches teachers may

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Social Class Within The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

Social classes in The Great Gatsby In today’s society many things revolve around your social class, and is that the way things should be? How big of a house you live in, what type of clothes you wear, how much money you have, are all questions that come into effect in today’s world. In the novel The Great Gatsby the theme of social class comes into effect quite often. All of the characters constantly pretend to be someone they are not just trying to be noticed by society. The author F. Scott Fitzgerald uses two main different ways to show social stratification in the book. The first one the author uses is where they live, and how nice their neighborhood and houses are. The second and biggest example that is used is the amount of money each different group has. This essay will discuss how the book, The Great Gatsby uses the social issue of different social classes to show how much of an effect it can put on people. â€Å"Social class is a broad group of society having c ommon economic, cultural, or political status† (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/social+class). In today’s world there are four main different social classes, which are, the lower class, the working class, the middle class, and then the upper class. The lower class consists of the homeless, unemployed and people in poverty. The working class is those who a somewhat educated and engage in manual labor examples of this would be jobs such as: carpenters, plumbers, and electricians. Then the middle class isShow MoreRelatedThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald1155 Words   |  5 PagesThe Great Gatsby The Jazz Age was an era where everything and anything seemed possible. It started with the beginning of a new age with America coming out of World War I as the most powerful nation in the world (Novel reflections on, 2007). As a result, the nation soon faced a culture-shock of material prosperity during the 1920’s. Also known as the â€Å"roaring twenties†, it was a time where life consisted of prodigality and extravagant parties. Writing based on his personal experiences, author F. ScottRead MoreEssay On Society In The Great Gatsby835 Words   |  4 Pagescreation of new job opportunities. Eventually, a more defined social class structure was established, bringing fluctuations in the distribution of wealth among different ranks in society. This period of time, known as the â€Å"Roaring Twenties†, is exhibited in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, who uses the characters in the novel to depict the conflict in American society. Gatsby, the central figure of the novel, represents the lower class and is followed as he attempts to achieve the benefits ofRead MoreThe Equality Myth Essays656 Words   |  3 PagesHubbard, Sociologist The Great Gatsby written by F. Scott Fitzgerald is as much a novel about social hierarchy as it is about class-consciousness. Throughout the novel we are bombarded with images of extravagant wealth and shuddering pauperism with the elite upper class using those around them as stepping-stones to their own selfish happiness. The novel makes a point to differentiate between classes within classes especially how the sociology of the wealthy differs within itself. The new millionairesRead More Destruction and Failure of a Generation in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby1413 Words   |  6 PagesThe Great Gatsby and the Destruction of a Generation      Ã‚   The beauty and splendor of Gatsbys parties masks the decay and corruption that lay at the heart of the Roaring Twenties. The society of the Jazz Age, as observed by Fitzgerald, is morally bankrupt, and thus continually plagued by a crisis of character. Jay Gatsby, though he struggles to be a part of this world, remains unalterably an outsider. His life is a grand irony, in that it is a caricature of Twenties-style ostentation: his closetRead MoreThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald890 Words   |  4 PagesThe Great Gatsby, we see evidence of the â€Å"Roaring 20s† in which it was set and the mindset of the author, F. Scott Fitzgerald when it was written in the 1950s. If we use this book as any indication of Fitzgerald’s thoughts we can see that he did not think very highly of women, especially within the upper class. All of the women in The Great Gatsby are either unpleasant, dishonest, or shallow. There are three female characters in The Great Gatsby; Daisy Buchanan, the love interest of Gatsby andRead MoreThe Colors of Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgeralds Famous Novel1640 Words   |  7 PagesF. Scott Fitzgerald is famous for the detail with which he crafted the quintessential American novel, The Great Gatsby. With his well-chosen words, Fitzgerald painted a fantastic portrait of life during the Roaring Twenties in the minds of his readers, a picture rich with color and excitement. Four colors: green, gold, white, and gray played key roles in the symbolic demonstration of ideas and feelings which, woven together seamlessly, made The Great Gatsby a world-renowned work of literary geniusRead MoreThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald1229 Words   |  5 PagesSimrandeep Farma ENG3U1-02 Ms. Vitelli 1/10/2015 The Great Gatsby The roaring twenties was the period known for its exuberant, overwhelming and free pop culture of all time. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby, represent the past historical modernization of a male subjugated social system. The Great Gatsby is a mysterious love tale, and a social interpretation towards the American Life. This story explores the journey for happiness and wealth through the American Dream, and shows howRead MoreThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald1621 Words   |  7 PagesThe 1920s were a time in American history that profoundly depicted social inequality, immorality, superficiality, and unrest. During this time period, the iconic story of F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, was written and published. In this revolutionary novel, F. Scott Fitzgerald revisits his fascinating childhood in a more fictitious manner. The Great Gatsby describes and details the life of a young man from Minnesota, known as Nick Carraway, who moves to New York after World W ar 1 during theRead MoreThe American Dream In The Great Gatsby1097 Words   |  5 PagesThe Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was one that was highly centralized around the American Dream. The American Dream is the belief that anyone can become successful in America if they worked hard enough. The dream did not discriminate anyone and that is why many people worked towards it. In the novel, it shows that not everyone was living the American Dream but were separated by the social classes of wealth, race, and intelligence. The 1920s in America was a roaringRead MoreThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald1412 Words   |  6 Pages Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby showcases the American society during the Roaring 1920s. During this time period many longed to be rich and become a member of the upper class. It became one’s dream to obtain good social standing rather than to achieve freedom and happiness. Fitzgerald creates characters, such as Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby, who are more concerned with wealth than what truly makes them happy in life. Therefore, many perceive the theme of this novel

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Comparing The Oppression Of Women And A Metaphorical...

In comparing the oppression of women to a metaphorical birdcage, Marilyn Frye’s essay â€Å"Oppression† expands the definition of what constitutes as an oppressive act. In doing so, some would argue that her definition allows for nearly every interaction between men and women to have some underlying sexist tone. Others, including myself, would deny such a claim and argue that as opposed to stretching the realms of sexism, Frye’s interpretation contributes to a deeper understanding of sexism in modern society. While it is true that Frye’s metaphor could be over applied and abused, in the long term, it is more beneficial than detrimental. Because the situation of women in the western world has improved vastly in comparison to other societies,†¦show more content†¦It is my belief that the sexism in this act lied firmly in the way he chuckled, and shook his head condescendingly at me. It was as though he were thinking to himself how cute it was that a little woman like me to hold open the door for a strong, capable man such as himself. In laughing at this simple, objectively polite act he confirmed the thought-process behind this â€Å"chivalrous act†. Men hold open the door for woman, not because it’s necessarily polite, but because men subconsciously believe women to be weak. Not only that, but consider the fact that rarely do men hold open the door for men. This is no doubt because men consider other men to be capable of handling themselves in all manners, especially in things as simple as holding open a door. However, this is only one side of the argument, and without the opposing side the discussion is limited. Others would argue that holding open a door is just that, nothing more or less. It is a polite act instilled in many people, especially those living in the Southern areas of the United States, where politeness is particularly emphasized. It could certainly be that is not the act that is sexist but the i ndividual reasons as to why one opens the door for another person. While one man may do so because he believes a woman needs unnecessary help, another may do it because it is not an out of the way gesture. One man may laugh at the act of a woman holding open the door for him, while another

Marketing Research †Short Outline Free Essays

MARKETING RESEARCH General information Definition: â€Å" Systematic and objective collection and analysis of information for the purpose of decision making in marketing â€Å" Key functions: Studies consumer behaviour Helps identify marketing opportunities problems Helps evaluate company’s marketing performance Helps select/ improve marketing strategy Marketing Research ? Market Research Provides data on Provides data on company’s environment company’s own roducts/services/current customers The Marketing Research Process 1. Problem definition 1. 1 Formulating decision problem (e. We will write a custom essay sample on Marketing Research – Short Outline or any similar topic only for you Order Now g. how to price new product) 1. 2 Determining purpose ; scope of research 2. Research Design Exploratory research: understanding the nature of a problem Conclusive research: answering research questions 2. 1 Choosing Types of data – Facts – Opinions – Motivations 2. 2 Locating Sources of data – Secondary data (previously published) Primary data (obtained directly from the consumer) 2. 3 Methods of Collecting Data from primary sources Observation: Analysing customer? s behaviour Self-reporting Focus group: take part in a discussion to analyse people`s reaction to special topics Projective technique: respondents are asked to say the first word that comes into their minds upon a specific topic Questionnaire: – Mail – Online – Telephone -Personal 2. 3 Selecting the Sample Sample: Group of elements (persons, stores, financial reports) chosen from among a total population Probability sample: Each unit has a known chance of being selected Nonprobability Sample: Sampling units are selected arbitrarily 2. 4 Anticipating the Results = Making a plan about how the marketing research and the final report will be designed 3. Research Conduction = Implementing the research plan 4. Data Processing = Transforming the information obtained into a report for management How to cite Marketing Research – Short Outline, Essays